Dak Prescott isn’t a sellout because he voiced his opinion

“I never said I didn’t believe in social injustice and things that are going on. I just said I didn’t think that the national anthem was the time.”

After Prescott’s rebuttal of his original language, voiced in the above video, his questionable stance sounds a bit more justified. Whether this was sincere or just a grand slam PR job, Prescott made remarks that many in America and most in black America don’t agree with.

Attacking another black person for voicing an opinion that’s contrary to the culture’s majority has always been a frustration of mine. Although his initial statement about the anthem protests tagged him as an “Uncle Tom,” I figured he meant it all in the most sincere way possible.


       

 


When Prescott said “I don’t think that’s the time or the venue to do so, (protest the national anthem)” I strongly disagreed with him. I see it through another lens. Since the NFL is such an influential sport and the most-watched sport in America, why not use it to better our country? So many people watch football games and they impact so many at the same time. When we’re talking racial injustice and lives being taken unjustly by those sent to “protect” us, protecting precious football shouldn’t be the focus or goal.

Those who complain about athletes bringing issues from society onto the football field, how about breast cancer awareness month? Players celebrate it yearly by wearing pink apparel and holding several ceremonies to bring awareness to the cause, inside the arena, which is the same thing. Prescott coincidentally wears a lot of pink because his mother was a victim of breast cancer. Nevertheless, the problem is just with the national anthem. The form of protest rubs people the wrong way and that’s not the players’ problem. It’s a simple difference in opinion.



That’s why I’m not willing to chastise Prescott for his stance or his statement. Well, his initial statement needed a publicist’s touch but his message, and the sincerity of his message resonated with me.

The fact that he doesn’t believe in protesting on the football field is his decision and it should be respected. He implied that he didn’t believe in social injustice and the things that are going on in our country. He just doesn’t believe in using football, which in it’s purest form is used as a getaway from life for social issues. Prescott just doesn’t see why activists are advocating so hard for protests before a football game. There’s reason in his belief and it’s not just a ridiculous belief.

Our society just struggles when opinions differ. That’s been our identity for generations dating back to the 1700s. Honoring one’s opinion when you don’t agree is very difficult for most. Also, as a black man, I know how we can act when we aren’t all on the same accord when it comes to our beliefs.

These are Prescott’s beliefs and although many of us don’t agree with them or even understand them, they are his beliefs. He did not sell out. He was asked about his beliefs and he disclosed them without disrespecting anyone of anything. He chooses to protest in a different way. The public hasn’t seen these actions yet but at just 25-years old, with two seasons under his belt, he has time to make a difference and redeem his name.

If not, advocates of the protest will have a field day taking swings at Dak Prescott’s character and his beliefs which will be his lasting reputation.

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